Origami heart bookmarks!

Origami heart bookmarks!

Winchester logic http://ift.tt/1ysOLOY

Winchester logic http://ift.tt/1ysOLOY

n0cturnalnicole:

drovie:

kranja:

erisiana:

lazlo15:

10knotes:

omfg that is just too adorable

i can show you the world

FEELS

if i ever fail to reblog this, assume that i am dead

i love you so, witch cat and brave kitten

adries

O

outdoor shower http://ift.tt/1yrnAnB

outdoor shower http://ift.tt/1yrnAnB

Amen, Jack. There are so many ways to beat writer’s block. You just have to find the one that works for you.

Amen, Jack. There are so many ways to beat writer’s block. You just have to find the one that works for you.

I really need to get one of these shirts.

I really need to get one of these shirts.

Literary reference FTW. Well played, Elijah.

Literary reference FTW. Well played, Elijah.

Off to Hawaii to catch some waves. Wish me well!
….especially as there’s a hurricane headed for the islands.
The situation has kind of made me think. As a writer, I’m continually putting my protagonists in harm’s way, backing my characters up against the wall, leaving them with no choice but the bad choice. Of course, I do that for the sake of plot, conflict, drama, and all things juicy to read.
But embarking on this work trip with a hurricane breathing down my neck has made me realize that I do it for another reason as well—because that’s life.
We’re often made to choose between a bad idea and a worse idea or physical safety and financial safety. Our world changes and grows around us and we have to adapt to survive.
So really, when you read about a character that is in dire straits, remember, there’s probably been a time when you’ve had to make a hard choice or a bad choice. Books after all, reflect us.
I’m not relishing a trip to Hawaii during hurricane season, but I’ll probably be fine. But until then, it’s making excellent drama for the story of my life. :)
Stay safe, everybody!




(robot credit: Steve Talkowski)

Off to Hawaii to catch some waves. Wish me well!

….especially as there’s a hurricane headed for the islands.

The situation has kind of made me think. As a writer, I’m continually putting my protagonists in harm’s way, backing my characters up against the wall, leaving them with no choice but the bad choice. Of course, I do that for the sake of plot, conflict, drama, and all things juicy to read.

But embarking on this work trip with a hurricane breathing down my neck has made me realize that I do it for another reason as well—because that’s life.

We’re often made to choose between a bad idea and a worse idea or physical safety and financial safety. Our world changes and grows around us and we have to adapt to survive.

So really, when you read about a character that is in dire straits, remember, there’s probably been a time when you’ve had to make a hard choice or a bad choice. Books after all, reflect us.

I’m not relishing a trip to Hawaii during hurricane season, but I’ll probably be fine. But until then, it’s making excellent drama for the story of my life. :)

Stay safe, everybody!

(robot credit: Steve Talkowski)

Just adorable! All kittens need tophats.  http://ift.tt/1szNl3C

Just adorable! All kittens need tophats. http://ift.tt/1szNl3C

steampunktendencies:

Sculpture by Flavio Zarck 
My new t-shirt design!!! http://ift.tt/1shwXbi

My new t-shirt design!!! http://ift.tt/1shwXbi

nixieseal:

positivelycurious:

SHELDON IS FREAKIN ADORABLE AND I WANT TO ADOPT HIM.

SHELDON! AAAAAUGH

Does anybody really need this many salt and vinegar fries? Yes. The answer is yes.

Does anybody really need this many salt and vinegar fries? Yes. The answer is yes.

Last night I learned what in cahoots means. It dates back to the United States French and Indian war, hundreds of years ago and refers to the shacks and huts the French trappers lived in called cahutes. The Native Americans sided with the French against the British colonists so the colonists said that the Native Americans and the French were “in cahutes” together.
It’s fascinating to think a turn of phrase still used today, really had meaning so long ago. It makes me wonder how many of our phrases will end up in the future when they have little or no connection to daily life anymore.

Last night I learned what in cahoots means. It dates back to the United States French and Indian war, hundreds of years ago and refers to the shacks and huts the French trappers lived in called cahutes. The Native Americans sided with the French against the British colonists so the colonists said that the Native Americans and the French were “in cahutes” together.

It’s fascinating to think a turn of phrase still used today, really had meaning so long ago. It makes me wonder how many of our phrases will end up in the future when they have little or no connection to daily life anymore.

Shira Chan, you hit the nail on the head. Sleeping Beauty is obviously a zombie.

Shira Chan, you hit the nail on the head. Sleeping Beauty is obviously a zombie.