Top Tips For Promoting Your Book Online  http://ift.tt/1rftwPU

Top Tips For Promoting Your Book Online  http://ift.tt/1rftwPU

The last day of RainbowCon means I have to leave all my new cool friends and go back home!! :’(
But the panels on the last day were just as great as the rest of the conference. I attended Publishing Dos and Don’ts, Blog Tours: Love ‘Em or Hate ‘Em, and ended the conference with a great panel on The Male Perspective.  Here are some of the takeaways:Always pay attention to publisher submission guidelines. The publisher will remember you if make them reformat your story to the submission format in order to read and edit it
Don’t cop an attitude or bad mouth editors or cover artist—that will come back to you
Don’t make a publisher send you a certified letter because you don’t reply to email and/or miss your deadline without contacting them. You are contractually obligated to be part of the publishing process—don’t be unresponsive. Not doing your edits puts you in breach of contract
If you can’t make a deadline just contact your editor. They’ll understand. Tell them why you can’t meet it and when you expect to meet the deadline
Make sure you look at galley proofs because once it’s printed you cannot fix it
Even if they suspect that a book will not be accepted, many editors still read a chapter or more (sometimes to the end) to give the story a fair assessment
Many publishing houses have a policy not to give feedback to authors if they reject a submission. However, authors can look at works that were accepted and often see where their submission did not meet the call
Read a publisher’s About page and make sure they accept your type of story before submitting
Finding out who the acquisition editor is and naming them in your email will make your submission stand out from all the “Dear Editor” letters
Scheduling a book to be published 9 months after acceptance is standard
Don’t write to trends because once you finish the story the trend is over. If you rush to publish it might not be very good. Trends are often cyclical. Put out a good book and then when the trend comes back around, up the marketing on the already pubbed book 
Don’t write to trends if you don’t like the genre. It comes thru in your writing
You can sign ebooks by using Authorgraph
Brick and mortar stores may be on the way out, but print on demand books will probably always be popular since people like to hold books in their hands
If you are willing to jump in and make the edits necessary instead of fighting every step of the way, editors are likely to want to work with you again
You don’t need to send a story to a freelance editor before sending for submission—beta readers and critique partners are great and cheaper 
Simultaneous submissions can get you banned from a publishing house if they don’t allow it and you do it anyway
While waiting for a submission response don’t publish the story online or continue editing the story
Don’t use family or friends for beta reading or at least train them on what to look for
Reading out loud when you edit. Also try recording it and listening to it read back to you for self editing
Do not use fans as beta readers—they’ll read everything you put out. Also retire betas if they become fans. They will no longer be useful for catching problems in your story
Blog Tours have an important place in helping advertise in a small genre
If blog has never read an author they will request an advanced copy to see if you fit in with their reviews
There are two types of blogs: review blogs and introduce author blogs 
Blog Tours have guest posts (controversial topics work best), excerpts/spotlights don’t work as well, interviews are so-so unless you already have a following
Gift cards are great giveaway prizes. Rafflecopter is great for getting readers to sign up for your other forms of social media. You should give away one prize for the entire tour not all stops
Ask blogs not to review the same day as they guest on the blog—that way the author gets two bumps in sales
Reviewers are getting something from Blog Tours too—they get traffic
Bloggers loooove to have premade copy/paste html code to put into their blog 
When setting up a Blog Tour, ask when your post will go up and check the link
Make sure you have purchase links for a book before you begin the Blog Tour
Get your posts to the blogger more than just two days before the tour stop—that’s not enough time
Ask blogger what they want: an interview, a themed post, a character post, a music playlist, pinterest boards, recipes—readers want something extra for coming to the tour
Bloggers and readers love banners for tours
Finding one champion passionate about the book is better than ten 5 star reviews
Don’t do just excerpts—save that and advertise the day you’re doing it as a special one-time deal. Save a cover reveal for another blog
Answer blog comments—even just a thank you is important. And ALWAYS say thank you to the bloggers if they host you
A blog host giveaway is not necessary but giving them a free copy of a future book in the future is nice
Pick a topic to guest post on that makes you approachable and someone readers identify with and want to interact with 
Have an easy to find website and a visible email address on it for readers and bloggers to contact you (not a contact form)
Men write M/M for realism but women read it for escapism. Women buoy up the M/M industry. There are not enough gay male readers
You can gauge society’s acceptance by women’s acceptance 
M/M fiction serves as an educational tool to help readers change their mind and alter their worldview
Most female M/M readers were tired of the sameness of heterosexual romance and M/M has layers and depth—it is more literary
Literature should not rely on stereotypes—books should have fully formed characters
If a man is not in touch with his feelings they should not be all over the page—he should have to dig for them
There has been a concerted effort by women to write more realistically and as a result, if you read M/M fiction without knowing the author, you often can’t tell if it’s a man or a woman writing it
The happily ever after has become the stereotype for romance but Gone With The Wind & Wuthering Heights had no HEA
Trope of jacking off in the shower has got to stop. Showers are for bathing
You can tell when an anus is relaxed. You don’t always need fingers!
"Gay For You" fiction ignores the journey that a gay person has to go through and is offensive
There are bisexuals in the world but there are few stories that show them 
M/M books suffer when M/F gender roles are assigned to them. Characters must be fully formed and not stereotypes
Literature should reflect the present world and where we want it to go but M/M doesn’t need to have characters get married to be a happy ever after 
You do not have to have penetrative sex to live happily ever after—there are men that do not do penetrative sex ever
Readers don’t like open or multiple partner relationships but those also occur in the real world
Be true to the people in the book. Being true to your characters is more important than a writing to a trend
Gay characters don’t have to fuck women to prove their masculinity
Don’t create women with a penis. Men should be men. Don’t find/replace a M/F romance and think it will fly as M/M 
A gay man’s preference to top or bottom will change over time because people change
A lot of problems lay with authors not creating fully formed characters—-make sure they are 3 dimensional beings!

And who’s the luckiest person at RainbowCon 2014—me!!! I won the spa package at the closing ceremonies raffle. 
I will miss all my LGBTQ writer friends when I leave tomorrow, but this weekend has been a wonderful learning experience. I have learned so much and met so many nice people.
I would definitely recommend all LGBTQ writers check out future RainbowCon events!

The last day of RainbowCon means I have to leave all my new cool friends and go back home!! :’(

But the panels on the last day were just as great as the rest of the conference. I attended Publishing Dos and Don’ts, Blog Tours: Love ‘Em or Hate ‘Em, and ended the conference with a great panel on The Male Perspective.  Here are some of the takeaways:

  • Always pay attention to publisher submission guidelines. The publisher will remember you if make them reformat your story to the submission format in order to read and edit it
  • Don’t cop an attitude or bad mouth editors or cover artist—that will come back to you
  • Don’t make a publisher send you a certified letter because you don’t reply to email and/or miss your deadline without contacting them. You are contractually obligated to be part of the publishing process—don’t be unresponsive. Not doing your edits puts you in breach of contract
  • If you can’t make a deadline just contact your editor. They’ll understand. Tell them why you can’t meet it and when you expect to meet the deadline
  • Make sure you look at galley proofs because once it’s printed you cannot fix it
  • Even if they suspect that a book will not be accepted, many editors still read a chapter or more (sometimes to the end) to give the story a fair assessment
  • Many publishing houses have a policy not to give feedback to authors if they reject a submission. However, authors can look at works that were accepted and often see where their submission did not meet the call
  • Read a publisher’s About page and make sure they accept your type of story before submitting
  • Finding out who the acquisition editor is and naming them in your email will make your submission stand out from all the “Dear Editor” letters
  • Scheduling a book to be published 9 months after acceptance is standard
  • Don’t write to trends because once you finish the story the trend is over. If you rush to publish it might not be very good. Trends are often cyclical. Put out a good book and then when the trend comes back around, up the marketing on the already pubbed book
  • Don’t write to trends if you don’t like the genre. It comes thru in your writing
  • You can sign ebooks by using Authorgraph
  • Brick and mortar stores may be on the way out, but print on demand books will probably always be popular since people like to hold books in their hands
  • If you are willing to jump in and make the edits necessary instead of fighting every step of the way, editors are likely to want to work with you again
  • You don’t need to send a story to a freelance editor before sending for submission—beta readers and critique partners are great and cheaper
  • Simultaneous submissions can get you banned from a publishing house if they don’t allow it and you do it anyway
  • While waiting for a submission response don’t publish the story online or continue editing the story
  • Don’t use family or friends for beta reading or at least train them on what to look for
  • Reading out loud when you edit. Also try recording it and listening to it read back to you for self editing
  • Do not use fans as beta readers—they’ll read everything you put out. Also retire betas if they become fans. They will no longer be useful for catching problems in your story
  • Blog Tours have an important place in helping advertise in a small genre
  • If blog has never read an author they will request an advanced copy to see if you fit in with their reviews
  • There are two types of blogs: review blogs and introduce author blogs
  • Blog Tours have guest posts (controversial topics work best), excerpts/spotlights don’t work as well, interviews are so-so unless you already have a following
  • Gift cards are great giveaway prizes. Rafflecopter is great for getting readers to sign up for your other forms of social media. You should give away one prize for the entire tour not all stops
  • Ask blogs not to review the same day as they guest on the blog—that way the author gets two bumps in sales
  • Reviewers are getting something from Blog Tours too—they get traffic
  • Bloggers loooove to have premade copy/paste html code to put into their blog
  • When setting up a Blog Tour, ask when your post will go up and check the link
  • Make sure you have purchase links for a book before you begin the Blog Tour
  • Get your posts to the blogger more than just two days before the tour stop—that’s not enough time
  • Ask blogger what they want: an interview, a themed post, a character post, a music playlist, pinterest boards, recipes—readers want something extra for coming to the tour
  • Bloggers and readers love banners for tours
  • Finding one champion passionate about the book is better than ten 5 star reviews
  • Don’t do just excerpts—save that and advertise the day you’re doing it as a special one-time deal. Save a cover reveal for another blog
  • Answer blog comments—even just a thank you is important. And ALWAYS say thank you to the bloggers if they host you
  • A blog host giveaway is not necessary but giving them a free copy of a future book in the future is nice
  • Pick a topic to guest post on that makes you approachable and someone readers identify with and want to interact with
  • Have an easy to find website and a visible email address on it for readers and bloggers to contact you (not a contact form)
  • Men write M/M for realism but women read it for escapism. Women buoy up the M/M industry. There are not enough gay male readers
  • You can gauge society’s acceptance by women’s acceptance
  • M/M fiction serves as an educational tool to help readers change their mind and alter their worldview
  • Most female M/M readers were tired of the sameness of heterosexual romance and M/M has layers and depth—it is more literary
  • Literature should not rely on stereotypes—books should have fully formed characters
  • If a man is not in touch with his feelings they should not be all over the page—he should have to dig for them
  • There has been a concerted effort by women to write more realistically and as a result, if you read M/M fiction without knowing the author, you often can’t tell if it’s a man or a woman writing it
  • The happily ever after has become the stereotype for romance but Gone With The Wind & Wuthering Heights had no HEA
  • Trope of jacking off in the shower has got to stop. Showers are for bathing
  • You can tell when an anus is relaxed. You don’t always need fingers!
  • "Gay For You" fiction ignores the journey that a gay person has to go through and is offensive
  • There are bisexuals in the world but there are few stories that show them
  • M/M books suffer when M/F gender roles are assigned to them. Characters must be fully formed and not stereotypes
  • Literature should reflect the present world and where we want it to go but M/M doesn’t need to have characters get married to be a happy ever after
  • You do not have to have penetrative sex to live happily ever after—there are men that do not do penetrative sex ever
  • Readers don’t like open or multiple partner relationships but those also occur in the real world
  • Be true to the people in the book. Being true to your characters is more important than a writing to a trend
  • Gay characters don’t have to fuck women to prove their masculinity
  • Don’t create women with a penis. Men should be men. Don’t find/replace a M/F romance and think it will fly as M/M 
  • A gay man’s preference to top or bottom will change over time because people change
  • A lot of problems lay with authors not creating fully formed characters—-make sure they are 3 dimensional beings!
And who’s the luckiest person at RainbowCon 2014—me!!! I won the spa package at the closing ceremonies raffle.

I will miss all my LGBTQ writer friends when I leave tomorrow, but this weekend has been a wonderful learning experience. I have learned so much and met so many nice people.

I would definitely recommend all LGBTQ writers check out future RainbowCon events!
.A writer does not own words any more than a painter owns colors. http://ift.tt/1gdNTc6

.A writer does not own words any more than a painter owns colors. http://ift.tt/1gdNTc6

After a trip to the Wawa (a Northern chain of truly amazing convenience stores) and seeing the moss growing on the trees in both a picturesque and creepy way, I attended more awesome panels at RainbowCon.  I attended “Writing Trans and Genderqueer Characters”, “The Vagina Dialogue: Women in Genre Fiction”, “We <3 Pussy: Discussion of Lesbian Fiction”, “Appropriation and Fetishization” “Behind the Curtain: An Inside Look at Publishing” and “Eww! I Don’t Like Those Bits!: Going Beyond Your Comfort Zone in Erotic Romance”. Here’s some takeaways:Writing Transsexual or Genderqueer fiction isn’t as hard as marketing it
Some review sites have a problem seeing transsexual men as “real” men, which is totally not cool 
You do not have to do a transition (hormones and surgery) to be transsexual —it’s a personal identity
Visibility of transsexual characters is important. Writers need to write the characters and identify them as transsexual so that people of that identity can see themselves in literature
It’s important to have stories where transsexual characters get a happily ever after because they deserve one too!  
Storm Moon Press would love to see a genderqueer character that transitions during the story or even back and forth
There are more real life brutalizations of Male to Female vs Female to Male transition individuals due to Western society misogyny against women. Men transitioning to women are “taking a step down” vs women to men are joining the dominant gender
It’s important to have transsexual young adult category so both transgender and non-transgender kids see it’s normal 
You can never do enough research on transsexual genderqueer when writing it 
Women writers have been slurred in fiction-writing throughout history 
Often the writing is not in question but Women In Genre fiction are instead attacked personally 
For centuries Women In Genre fiction-writing have taken male or neutral pseudonyms but the internet makes it hard to hide and that might be good 
The opposite is men who write romance as men are also getting discrimination and being told they don’t know how to love and therefore can’t write about it
Women are buying children’s books. They should encourage boys to read women authors
If you are a Woman In Genre fiction-writing you must remain professional in the face of criticism
Women characters in lesbian fiction deserve stories with romantic challenges and friendships that lead to relationships
Women are strong and we need strong fictional characters to represent us
Writers of lesbian fiction would love readers to come to a story and not worry about what their characters do in the bedroom or how they have sex 
Gay men are worried women are appropriating the gay male experience
There is some objectification when porn is involved but most romance writers are not writing for that purpose
You should write what you feel called to write whether people are offended or not just write it well
Some gay men are just happy to see gay literature and gay characters and don’t care if men or women are writing it
Fiction writers appropriate everything they write, in every genre. There will always be someone who is offended
Never respond to an offended person especially online as it only escalates 
All romance objectifies no matter the sex but it can also educate and show that all people love
Gays in literature have gone from bad guy, martyr, comic relief, fetishization and will eventually just be guys 
People don’t complain if there’s too little sex in a story but will always complain if there is not enough characterization
Publishers are no longer requiring sex scenes in order to get LGBTQ readers. Sex should only further the plot
Fiction doesn’t hurt anybody as no real person is being harmed. Books don’t compel people to do things—if they do something there are other problems in their life that are contributing not just their reading material
Readers don’t always understand that the opinions of the character are not necessarily that of the author 
All romance covers look the same because that’s what sells. Becasue people like naked chests and overflowing bodices
Never engag on Goodreads but if a reader takes the time to email you from your website there’s a chance for possible dialogue
Everybody brings their own experience to reading a book. Reviews are often about the reader not the book
If you can educate one person about LGBTQ issues then it will have a ripple effect on the people they know
Bad LGBTQ self-pubbed books will fail as the readership will abandon them and they won’t make that quick buck
Anyone is entitled to write anything they want. No scifi would exist if we only wrote what we’ve experienced
Read everything in your publishing contract and negotiate
Three types of stories come in to publishing houses: one that will need only light line edits; one that will need a few changes; and ones that will need to be overhauled to be published
If a book requires lots of work, publishers will take it on if it fits a niche or is different or on a topic trending in the market
A successful publishing run can go from 100 to 2000 books a month depending on the type of book, the subject matter and whether the author is famous
A good author can pull off a difficult story that a reader might not always choose to read
There has been backlash on reviewers who refuse to review bisexual or transsexual characters
A vocal minority often tries to set the rules for fiction trying to step out of the box—writers can’t let that minority’s limited view restrict them. Writers can’t let readers dictate what can and can’t be in their book. If you allow a few readers to control what all writers write, there will be basically the same books written over and over 
Writer can find kinks they don’t enjoy and still find erotic elements that speak to them and help them write it
It’s the responsibility of the reader not to seek out books that might trigger panic attacks—do not put that on writer. Goodreads reviews can warn you much better about what’s in a book if you think you might be triggered
Apparently in an Mpreg (male pregnancy) story one of the partners needs a “duderus” to carry the baby—LOL!
If you attempt to read more widely it may make you less judgy about what other people like
If you don’t like Swiss cheese don’t eat it. Just because you don’t like Swiss cheese don’t say it sucks

Off to the pizza party and possibly a rainbow jello shot!  I’m so glad I wrote all this down in case I party so hard I forget it. ;)

After a trip to the Wawa (a Northern chain of truly amazing convenience stores) and seeing the moss growing on the trees in both a picturesque and creepy way, I attended more awesome panels at RainbowCon.  I attended “Writing Trans and Genderqueer Characters”, “The Vagina Dialogue: Women in Genre Fiction”, “We <3 Pussy: Discussion of Lesbian Fiction”, “Appropriation and Fetishization” “Behind the Curtain: An Inside Look at Publishing” and “Eww! I Don’t Like Those Bits!: Going Beyond Your Comfort Zone in Erotic Romance”. Here’s some takeaways:

  • Writing Transsexual or Genderqueer fiction isn’t as hard as marketing it
  • Some review sites have a problem seeing transsexual men as “real” men, which is totally not cool
  • You do not have to do a transition (hormones and surgery) to be transsexual —it’s a personal identity
  • Visibility of transsexual characters is important. Writers need to write the characters and identify them as transsexual so that people of that identity can see themselves in literature
  • It’s important to have stories where transsexual characters get a happily ever after because they deserve one too! 
  • Storm Moon Press would love to see a genderqueer character that transitions during the story or even back and forth
  • There are more real life brutalizations of Male to Female vs Female to Male transition individuals due to Western society misogyny against women. Men transitioning to women are “taking a step down” vs women to men are joining the dominant gender
  • It’s important to have transsexual young adult category so both transgender and non-transgender kids see it’s normal
  • You can never do enough research on transsexual genderqueer when writing it
  • Women writers have been slurred in fiction-writing throughout history
  • Often the writing is not in question but Women In Genre fiction are instead attacked personally
  • For centuries Women In Genre fiction-writing have taken male or neutral pseudonyms but the internet makes it hard to hide and that might be good
  • The opposite is men who write romance as men are also getting discrimination and being told they don’t know how to love and therefore can’t write about it
  • Women are buying children’s books. They should encourage boys to read women authors
  • If you are a Woman In Genre fiction-writing you must remain professional in the face of criticism
  • Women characters in lesbian fiction deserve stories with romantic challenges and friendships that lead to relationships
  • Women are strong and we need strong fictional characters to represent us
  • Writers of lesbian fiction would love readers to come to a story and not worry about what their characters do in the bedroom or how they have sex
  • Gay men are worried women are appropriating the gay male experience
  • There is some objectification when porn is involved but most romance writers are not writing for that purpose
  • You should write what you feel called to write whether people are offended or not just write it well
  • Some gay men are just happy to see gay literature and gay characters and don’t care if men or women are writing it
  • Fiction writers appropriate everything they write, in every genre. There will always be someone who is offended
  • Never respond to an offended person especially online as it only escalates
  • All romance objectifies no matter the sex but it can also educate and show that all people love
  • Gays in literature have gone from bad guy, martyr, comic relief, fetishization and will eventually just be guys
  • People don’t complain if there’s too little sex in a story but will always complain if there is not enough characterization
  • Publishers are no longer requiring sex scenes in order to get LGBTQ readers. Sex should only further the plot
  • Fiction doesn’t hurt anybody as no real person is being harmed. Books don’t compel people to do things—if they do something there are other problems in their life that are contributing not just their reading material
  • Readers don’t always understand that the opinions of the character are not necessarily that of the author
  • All romance covers look the same because that’s what sells. Becasue people like naked chests and overflowing bodices
  • Never engag on Goodreads but if a reader takes the time to email you from your website there’s a chance for possible dialogue
  • Everybody brings their own experience to reading a book. Reviews are often about the reader not the book
  • If you can educate one person about LGBTQ issues then it will have a ripple effect on the people they know
  • Bad LGBTQ self-pubbed books will fail as the readership will abandon them and they won’t make that quick buck
  • Anyone is entitled to write anything they want. No scifi would exist if we only wrote what we’ve experienced
  • Read everything in your publishing contract and negotiate
  • Three types of stories come in to publishing houses: one that will need only light line edits; one that will need a few changes; and ones that will need to be overhauled to be published
  • If a book requires lots of work, publishers will take it on if it fits a niche or is different or on a topic trending in the market
  • A successful publishing run can go from 100 to 2000 books a month depending on the type of book, the subject matter and whether the author is famous
  • A good author can pull off a difficult story that a reader might not always choose to read
  • There has been backlash on reviewers who refuse to review bisexual or transsexual characters
  • A vocal minority often tries to set the rules for fiction trying to step out of the box—writers can’t let that minority’s limited view restrict them. Writers can’t let readers dictate what can and can’t be in their book. If you allow a few readers to control what all writers write, there will be basically the same books written over and over
  • Writer can find kinks they don’t enjoy and still find erotic elements that speak to them and help them write it
  • It’s the responsibility of the reader not to seek out books that might trigger panic attacks—do not put that on writer. Goodreads reviews can warn you much better about what’s in a book if you think you might be triggered
  • Apparently in an Mpreg (male pregnancy) story one of the partners needs a “duderus” to carry the baby—LOL!
  • If you attempt to read more widely it may make you less judgy about what other people like
  • If you don’t like Swiss cheese don’t eat it. Just because you don’t like Swiss cheese don’t say it sucks
Off to the pizza party and possibly a rainbow jello shot!  I’m so glad I wrote all this down in case I party so hard I forget it. ;)
The Five Elements of a Story - our character needs something to care about, something to want, something to dread, something to suffer, and something to learn. http://ift.tt/1f4Tey7

The Five Elements of a Story - our character needs something to care about, something to want, something to dread, something to suffer, and something to learn. http://ift.tt/1f4Tey7

Keeping Up Appearances - four ways to dress your characters - and truly awesome tights http://ift.tt/1f4Tgpq

Keeping Up Appearances - four ways to dress your characters - and truly awesome tights http://ift.tt/1f4Tgpq

Why Revenge is Such a Brilliant Plot for Beginner Writers  http://ift.tt/1gdNQwT

Why Revenge is Such a Brilliant Plot for Beginner Writers  http://ift.tt/1gdNQwT

.10 Vital Novel Writing Tips http://ift.tt/1iqc6eN

.10 Vital Novel Writing Tips http://ift.tt/1iqc6eN

RainbowCon 2014 Day Two
So did I mention there were strippers dressed as firemen at the Welcome Event last night&#8230;No? There were. And the boys from Florida Thunder worked very hard for their tips. Very hard. But enough of that, let&#8217;s get to the good stuff&#8212;the panels. Last night was the Pornodome: Erotica vs. Romance vs. Porn.  I attended several panels again today: Trends in Young Adult Fiction, Contract Dos and Don&#8217;ts, Using Stereotypes To Your Advantage, Moving Past The G&#8212;LBTQ Fiction, Don&#8217;t Quit Your Day Job, and Taboos in Romance.
Romance is a story based on a relationship betwn 2 people with the sex furthering the romance 
Erotica has story and a journey of a character(s). Porn is sex with very little story 
Erotica has a relationship-not necessarily a love relationship-can be a trust relationship like BDSM or in stories with no HEA 
If the explicit sex scenes can be cut out and the relationship is still there, that&#8217;s erotica
Publishers define the lines between romance or erotic romance or erotica
Consensus-as long as readers can find your books, you&#8217;re okay but many online retailers miscategorize ertotica, romance, and porn
Romance is a 1.5 billion dollar business that has been keeping the publishing world afloat
Literature comes before social change. LGBT romance has led to acceptance and now marriage equality 
Women reading gay romance made the business model successful enough to become popular and accepted 
Young Adult fiction needs more real villains. Readers are not delicate flowers. Stories don&#8217;t have to be sanitized because life is not 
The American Library Association has a Rainbow Project to encourage Young Adult LGBT purchases by libraries
Miss Condit, True Colors, Rainbow Reviews all have Young Adult novel reviews
How do you make the classic tropes of first love and coming out fresh? Plot driven intimacy and new genre settings
Coming out is always fresh to the Young Adult audience because YA readers are still coming out and it&#8217;s new to them
Flamingnet Teen Book Reviews lets you submit your Young Adult book and teenagers choose whether to read and review it
Contracts&#8212;Do not give up your worldwide rights if your publisher doesn&#8217;t translate. Don&#8217;t sell your audio rights to a publisher that doesn&#8217;t make audio books. Don&#8217;t give print rights to digital only publishers
Contracts&#8212;Watch for a similar works clause&#8212;If you sign away your rights then the publisher can get a more famous author to rewrite your novel or in the universe you created
Contracts&#8212;A contract should outline how a breach of contract should be handled so authors are protected from shady publishers
Contracts&#8212;Uncooperative publishers who refuse certified breach letters&#8212;contact a lawyer, contact 3rd party distributors to take down your books with a cease and desist letter
Contracts&#8212;If an author is dealing with a shady publisher in breach, make sure you talk about it and don&#8217;t refer authors to them
Contracts&#8212;When your rights revert to you the author gets their original unedited work back. Some publishers allow authors to purchase the edited version and sometimes the cover, too
Contracts&#8212;Make sure you get a proof copy before the work is printed 
Contracts&#8212;Make sure you have a definition of the publisher&#8217;s idea of net income. Does the publisher take out distribution fees, editing fees, printing fees, etc.?
Contracts&#8212;Make sure royalties clauses say when you will get paid not just how or how much
Contracts&#8212;Make sure there&#8217;s an audit clause and your have the right to hire someone to audit their practices concerning your books
Contracts&#8212;Make sure price adjustments have a grace period so your book doesn&#8217;t start at $6.99 and then remain $0.99 for the rest of the contract period
Contracts&#8212;Never sign away a work for life. Anything over 5 years with a small publisher is excessive
Contracts&#8212;Watch buyout clauses. Don&#8217;t let a publisher force you to buyout your contract at an exorbitant fee just because your book is not selling
Contracts&#8212;There should always be a clause saying that your work will be printed within a year of the projected publication date
Contracts&#8212;Make sure if a publisher sells outstanding inventory after your contract end, that there&#8217;s a claus saying they have to pay you royalties on the inventory
Contracts&#8212;Watch for right of first refusal paired with future books kept at same contract terms
Contracts&#8212;Never ever sign a non disclosure agreement so that when a publisher starts acting badly you can tell people about it 
Negative reviews do not affect sales only authors attacking reviewers affects sales
Stereotypes are bad vs archetypes good. Caricature vs. character
It becomes a stereotype because there&#8217;s an element of truth but that behavior shouldn&#8217;t be the only thing about the character
Stereotypes can be written and then you can twist the stereotype, enlighten and inform by breaking them
Romances already have one main stereotype&#8212;the Happily Ever After&#8212;so you can&#8217;t have any others in your story
Gay men can be capable and masculine-Put them where they are without justifying why they belong there
Top or Bottom? Story has nothing to do with who fucks who but instead how much they grow in the story
Hot guy stereotypes are the norm but it would be validating to see more realistic body types
Love makes anyone beautiful in the eyes of their lover, so write some average looking characters
Stereotypes change over time but are always a gross generalization two dimensional character
Make sure you do your research and build authentic LGBTQ characters or they won&#8217;t ring true
Women&#8217;s sexuality can be more fluid possibility due to biology and society as well as expectation
If you have a bisexual character they do not have to have sex with both genders in the story to prove their bisexuality
Editors want stories with bisexual or trans characters that are not about their sexuality but just happen to be bisexual or trans
All the blogs say you have to write everyday but give up the guilt if you can&#8217;t do every day try once a week
Prioritize your new book writing over doing promotion over doing blog posts over doing social media
Don&#8217;t shirk your responsibilities to your family just to write-Writing is selfish. Quitting your job means going hungry
If you quit your day job then you lose life experience that you can write about
That time you sneak in to write is the job you like best&#8212;the other one pays the bills and makes writing possible
A lot of famous authors like Kurt Vonnegut and Henry James also had day jobs while they wrote
Don&#8217;t be angry about your day job&#8212;it&#8217;s what pays the bills. You can write in comfort because of it
Nobody wants to go to the grave missing out on doing fun things in life or let relationships fail because of writing
You have to let your day job writing go to write creatively and not let the bad habits of day job writing follow you to your fiction writing
Not writing full time forces you to write the stories of your heart not what makes the most money or on a deadline
If you&#8217;re tired don&#8217;t write just walk away
If you write full-time you run the risk of writing becomes the job you hate
Don&#8217;t stress just publish when you can and enjoy being creative
Word counts are good for submitting to a publisher but not meant for daily stress creation. Writing takes as long as it does
How hard are taboo stories to sell? Incest stories can&#8217;t be sold on Amazon even with a small publishing house if it&#8217;s flagged by a reader
Highly animalistic taboo fiction like tentacles or shifters are publishable if it has a fully human intelligence&#8212;it is not considered beastiality 
Taboos are all very fine lines because what one person likes disgusts someone else
Taboos fiction is not hard to come by but it is hard to sell&#8212;A taboo book needs the right marketing behind it
Anthropomorphic (human looking animals or animal trait humans) taboos are rare but publishers are looking for them
Often readers can&#8217;t find books with taboos and go to fanfic online to find what they want to read
Priest taboos&#8212; religion vs the body&#8217;s urges is even being cashed in for male model calenders
Whew! It&#8217;s midnight so I&#8217;m going to get some sleep for another full day of workshops tomorrow.

RainbowCon 2014 Day Two

So did I mention there were strippers dressed as firemen at the Welcome Event last night…No? There were. And the boys from Florida Thunder worked very hard for their tips. Very hard.

But enough of that, let’s get to the good stuff—the panels. Last night was the Pornodome: Erotica vs. Romance vs. Porn.  I attended several panels again today: Trends in Young Adult Fiction, Contract Dos and Don’ts, Using Stereotypes To Your Advantage, Moving Past The G—LBTQ Fiction, Don’t Quit Your Day Job, and Taboos in Romance.

  • Romance is a story based on a relationship betwn 2 people with the sex furthering the romance 
  • Erotica has story and a journey of a character(s). Porn is sex with very little story 
  • Erotica has a relationship-not necessarily a love relationship-can be a trust relationship like BDSM or in stories with no HEA 
  • If the explicit sex scenes can be cut out and the relationship is still there, that’s erotica
  • Publishers define the lines between romance or erotic romance or erotica
  • Consensus-as long as readers can find your books, you’re okay but many online retailers miscategorize ertotica, romance, and porn
  • Romance is a 1.5 billion dollar business that has been keeping the publishing world afloat
  • Literature comes before social change. LGBT romance has led to acceptance and now marriage equality 
  • Women reading gay romance made the business model successful enough to become popular and accepted 
  • Young Adult fiction needs more real villains. Readers are not delicate flowers. Stories don’t have to be sanitized because life is not 
  • The American Library Association has a Rainbow Project to encourage Young Adult LGBT purchases by libraries
  • Miss Condit, True Colors, Rainbow Reviews all have Young Adult novel reviews
  • How do you make the classic tropes of first love and coming out fresh? Plot driven intimacy and new genre settings
  • Coming out is always fresh to the Young Adult audience because YA readers are still coming out and it’s new to them
  • Flamingnet Teen Book Reviews lets you submit your Young Adult book and teenagers choose whether to read and review it
  • Contracts—Do not give up your worldwide rights if your publisher doesn’t translate. Don’t sell your audio rights to a publisher that doesn’t make audio books. Don’t give print rights to digital only publishers
  • Contracts—Watch for a similar works clause—If you sign away your rights then the publisher can get a more famous author to rewrite your novel or in the universe you created
  • Contracts—A contract should outline how a breach of contract should be handled so authors are protected from shady publishers
  • Contracts—Uncooperative publishers who refuse certified breach letters—contact a lawyer, contact 3rd party distributors to take down your books with a cease and desist letter
  • Contracts—If an author is dealing with a shady publisher in breach, make sure you talk about it and don’t refer authors to them
  • Contracts—When your rights revert to you the author gets their original unedited work back. Some publishers allow authors to purchase the edited version and sometimes the cover, too
  • Contracts—Make sure you get a proof copy before the work is printed 
  • Contracts—Make sure you have a definition of the publisher’s idea of net income. Does the publisher take out distribution fees, editing fees, printing fees, etc.?
  • Contracts—Make sure royalties clauses say when you will get paid not just how or how much
  • Contracts—Make sure there’s an audit clause and your have the right to hire someone to audit their practices concerning your books
  • Contracts—Make sure price adjustments have a grace period so your book doesn’t start at $6.99 and then remain $0.99 for the rest of the contract period
  • Contracts—Never sign away a work for life. Anything over 5 years with a small publisher is excessive
  • Contracts—Watch buyout clauses. Don’t let a publisher force you to buyout your contract at an exorbitant fee just because your book is not selling
  • Contracts—There should always be a clause saying that your work will be printed within a year of the projected publication date
  • Contracts—Make sure if a publisher sells outstanding inventory after your contract end, that there’s a claus saying they have to pay you royalties on the inventory
  • Contracts—Watch for right of first refusal paired with future books kept at same contract terms
  • Contracts—Never ever sign a non disclosure agreement so that when a publisher starts acting badly you can tell people about it 
  • Negative reviews do not affect sales only authors attacking reviewers affects sales
  • Stereotypes are bad vs archetypes good. Caricature vs. character
  • It becomes a stereotype because there’s an element of truth but that behavior shouldn’t be the only thing about the character
  • Stereotypes can be written and then you can twist the stereotype, enlighten and inform by breaking them
  • Romances already have one main stereotype—the Happily Ever After—so you can’t have any others in your story
  • Gay men can be capable and masculine-Put them where they are without justifying why they belong there
  • Top or Bottom? Story has nothing to do with who fucks who but instead how much they grow in the story
  • Hot guy stereotypes are the norm but it would be validating to see more realistic body types
  • Love makes anyone beautiful in the eyes of their lover, so write some average looking characters
  • Stereotypes change over time but are always a gross generalization two dimensional character
  • Make sure you do your research and build authentic LGBTQ characters or they won’t ring true
  • Women’s sexuality can be more fluid possibility due to biology and society as well as expectation
  • If you have a bisexual character they do not have to have sex with both genders in the story to prove their bisexuality
  • Editors want stories with bisexual or trans characters that are not about their sexuality but just happen to be bisexual or trans
  • All the blogs say you have to write everyday but give up the guilt if you can’t do every day try once a week
  • Prioritize your new book writing over doing promotion over doing blog posts over doing social media
  • Don’t shirk your responsibilities to your family just to write-Writing is selfish. Quitting your job means going hungry
  • If you quit your day job then you lose life experience that you can write about
  • That time you sneak in to write is the job you like best—the other one pays the bills and makes writing possible
  • A lot of famous authors like Kurt Vonnegut and Henry James also had day jobs while they wrote
  • Don’t be angry about your day job—it’s what pays the bills. You can write in comfort because of it
  • Nobody wants to go to the grave missing out on doing fun things in life or let relationships fail because of writing
  • You have to let your day job writing go to write creatively and not let the bad habits of day job writing follow you to your fiction writing
  • Not writing full time forces you to write the stories of your heart not what makes the most money or on a deadline
  • If you’re tired don’t write just walk away
  • If you write full-time you run the risk of writing becomes the job you hate
  • Don’t stress just publish when you can and enjoy being creative
  • Word counts are good for submitting to a publisher but not meant for daily stress creation. Writing takes as long as it does
  • How hard are taboo stories to sell? Incest stories can’t be sold on Amazon even with a small publishing house if it’s flagged by a reader
  • Highly animalistic taboo fiction like tentacles or shifters are publishable if it has a fully human intelligence—it is not considered beastiality 
  • Taboos are all very fine lines because what one person likes disgusts someone else
  • Taboos fiction is not hard to come by but it is hard to sell—A taboo book needs the right marketing behind it
  • Anthropomorphic (human looking animals or animal trait humans) taboos are rare but publishers are looking for them
  • Often readers can’t find books with taboos and go to fanfic online to find what they want to read
  • Priest taboos— religion vs the body’s urges is even being cashed in for male model calenders

Whew! It’s midnight so I’m going to get some sleep for another full day of workshops tomorrow.

Writing without revising is the literary equivalent of waltzing gaily out of the house in your underwear &#8212; Patricia Fuller http://ift.tt/1iqc4Uc

Writing without revising is the literary equivalent of waltzing gaily out of the house in your underwear — Patricia Fuller http://ift.tt/1iqc4Uc

RainbowCon 2014 Day One
The first day at RainbowCon has been enlightening!  I&#8217;ve attended three workshops so far&#8212;one on marketing, another on tropes that will not die, and a third on writing diverse characters.  Here are some of my favorite takeaways from them:
Pen names&#8212;consider how easy it is to pronounce and spell for marketing purposes
Multiple pen names lead to multiple marketing responsibilities but multiple genres under one name can confuse and even anger readers 
Pick a pen name that readers won&#8217;t be embarrassed to have on the paperback cover they are reading at the beach
Look for reviews of books similar to yours and then offer your book to the reviewers as something they might like
The Goodreads M/M Romance Group has a yearly short story event that is a good place for authors to get their name in front of readers
Goodreads has a program called Don&#8217;t Buy My Love in the M/M Romance group that allows authors to sign up for reviews
Your fans enjoy teasers and snippets or even posts from your characters 
Going to conventions outside your normal genre can gain you more readers. For example, if you write science fiction erotica&#8212;go to erotica conventions and science fiction conventions
If you decide to use a book marketing service - Get References!!
Pen names are good for keeping YA readers from stumbling upon your erotica
Goodreads M/M Romance Group has a Gayology 101 thread where you can ask any question about gay culture and get an answer
Tropes get a bad name because of poor execution and new authors that rely heavily on them
Tropes are often not very realistic but are sometimes comforting for readers
Once a reader recognizes a trope, it can take them out of the story
A self-discovery story is different from a Gay For You story
An Out For You story is the realistic version of Gay For You
Gay For You tropes are bad because being gay is not a choice. Being out is a choice
The Hurt/Comfort trope is a wish that the person you love will love you at your worst
Diverse characters in terms of race and religion makes for a richer book
The ethnicity and religion of a character informs their decisions in the story 
If you are LGBTQ you can hide in the closet but you cannot hide your skin color
If your book has characters from a different background than yours, do your research and be respectful
Book covers are designed to get you to buy the book not necessarily reflect the inside characters
Racism in fiction can be written subtly because racism in real life is not always overt 
Don&#8217;t be afraid to put characters together that don&#8217;t &#8220;fit&#8221; - those are often the best romantic couples
That&#8217;s it for the learning!  I&#8217;m off to the Welcome Event (complete with male strippers!!) and then on to the Porndrome to find out what separates Romance, Erotica, and Porn (although I have a pretty good idea already).

RainbowCon 2014 Day One

The first day at RainbowCon has been enlightening!  I’ve attended three workshops so far—one on marketing, another on tropes that will not die, and a third on writing diverse characters.  Here are some of my favorite takeaways from them:

  • Pen names—consider how easy it is to pronounce and spell for marketing purposes
  • Multiple pen names lead to multiple marketing responsibilities but multiple genres under one name can confuse and even anger readers 
  • Pick a pen name that readers won’t be embarrassed to have on the paperback cover they are reading at the beach
  • Look for reviews of books similar to yours and then offer your book to the reviewers as something they might like
  • The Goodreads M/M Romance Group has a yearly short story event that is a good place for authors to get their name in front of readers
  • Goodreads has a program called Don’t Buy My Love in the M/M Romance group that allows authors to sign up for reviews
  • Your fans enjoy teasers and snippets or even posts from your characters 
  • Going to conventions outside your normal genre can gain you more readers. For example, if you write science fiction erotica—go to erotica conventions and science fiction conventions
  • If you decide to use a book marketing service - Get References!!
  • Pen names are good for keeping YA readers from stumbling upon your erotica
  • Goodreads M/M Romance Group has a Gayology 101 thread where you can ask any question about gay culture and get an answer
  • Tropes get a bad name because of poor execution and new authors that rely heavily on them
  • Tropes are often not very realistic but are sometimes comforting for readers
  • Once a reader recognizes a trope, it can take them out of the story
  • A self-discovery story is different from a Gay For You story
  • An Out For You story is the realistic version of Gay For You
  • Gay For You tropes are bad because being gay is not a choice. Being out is a choice
  • The Hurt/Comfort trope is a wish that the person you love will love you at your worst
  • Diverse characters in terms of race and religion makes for a richer book
  • The ethnicity and religion of a character informs their decisions in the story 
  • If you are LGBTQ you can hide in the closet but you cannot hide your skin color
  • If your book has characters from a different background than yours, do your research and be respectful
  • Book covers are designed to get you to buy the book not necessarily reflect the inside characters
  • Racism in fiction can be written subtly because racism in real life is not always overt 
  • Don’t be afraid to put characters together that don’t “fit” - those are often the best romantic couples

That’s it for the learning!  I’m off to the Welcome Event (complete with male strippers!!) and then on to the Porndrome to find out what separates Romance, Erotica, and Porn (although I have a pretty good idea already).

luna-calamity:

lifebyjorge:

neodarkstar:

trigonyan:

FUCK YOU I ACTUALLY CRIED

This is the absolute BESTcomic I’ve ever read on this website.

And i just cried…so hard…

I EXPECTED THIS TO BE FUNNY AND SILLY BUT MY HEART

Woohoo! Checked in and ready for #RainbowCon Lead me to my favorite authors!! #DiversifyMe

Woohoo! Checked in and ready for #RainbowCon Lead me to my favorite authors!! #DiversifyMe

Easter egg hunt at the breakfast buffet! #Easteregg #Easter #RainbowCon #breakfast #cuteideas #holidays

Easter egg hunt at the breakfast buffet! #Easteregg #Easter #RainbowCon #breakfast #cuteideas #holidays